#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Who Would You Be…

Without your story?  (By story, I mean the things you’ve always told yourself, ABOUT yourself.  For instance, “I’m fat”, “I’m smart”, “I’m this, that, or the other thing…”)

This is a question I’m asking myself today.  It was prompted partly by my journal, and partly by a random newsletter received by email.  (Divine intervention?) “Who Would You Be Without Your Story?” is, I believe, the title of a book by a very wise woman named Byron Katie.
We creative types are especially good at telling ourselves stories.  I’m a past-master at it, because I’ve been spinning yarns, on paper and in my head, since I was a very small child.  It’s a necessary part of my work, telling stories.  It’s what I do, and I love it.  The trouble is, I often forget to shut off the storymaking machine in my head when I leave the computer.
I tell myself a variety of things.  Many of them are good.  A lot of them, however, could use some improvement.  :)  And it’s only logical to wonder how many of these tales are actually TRUE?
When I make a mistake, I tend to berate myself for it, because one of my many besetting sins is perfectionism.  I’ll bet a lot of you can identify.  If I’m not careful, I might tell myself something like, “You’re an idiot.”
Is that true?  (Depends on who you ask.  :)  Just kidding.)  I’m gloriously imperfect, being a card-carrying human being, but I’m definitely NOT an idiot.  
Stories.  They become our operating system, like Vista in a PC, and guide our thoughts, attitudes and, inevitably, our actions.  I don’t know about you, but I’m going to take a much closer look at the things I’m telling myself.
That’s my story, and I’m sticking to it.  

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