#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller

Western Facts

The stitching across the toe of a cowboy boot is called a toe wrinkle.

A “ten gallon hat” can’t hold ten gallons of anything.

Back in earlier days, a cattle drive would average 10-12 miles a day.

The term “keep your ear to the ground” comes from literally putting an ear to the ground to listen for hoof beats.

“Keep your ear to the ground” referred to the practice of plainsmen listening to the ground to hear hoof beats. It became the westerner’s warning to stay alert.

Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

Around 1541, the present state of Texas was called Tejas, a Spanish version of the Caddo word meaning “allies.”

Texas was the most active gunfighting state, with some 160 shoot-outs from the 1850’s through the 1890’s.

Though the term “stick ’em up” is widely used in Western films, it wasn’t actually coined until the 1930’s.

The Pony Express was in operation for only nineteen months from April 1860 through October 1861.

The Pony Express carried almost 35,000 pieces of mail over more than 650,000 miles during those nineteen months and lost only one mail sack.

The typical Pony Express rider was nineteen years old and made $100-$150 per month plus room and board.

From the end of the Civil War until 1890, some 10 million head of cattle were driven from Texas to Kansas.

In the old times sometimes cowboys referred to beans as “Deceitful Beans” because they talked behind your back.

Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

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