#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Truancy

The temptation was just too great. I sneaked away from my computer yesterday and went downtown to see a movie. I think it’s the first one I’ve gone to, instead of waiting for the DVD, since last December, when I was alone in Vegas and killing time.

You won’t be surprised to know that it was “Julie and Julia”, and I loved it, even though I’ve read both books–the script is a combination of the above-mentioned title and “My Life in France”, a sort of bio-auto-biography of Julia Child, and therefore pretty much knew everything that was going to happen. The performances were amazing–especially Streep’s–with her usual brilliance, she did not portray Julia Child, she became Julia Child.

It was so much fun to watch the cooking scenes–and I was pleased when the Boeuf Bourguingon (sp?) looked exactly the way mine does!

Rare is the movie I will watch more than once. I have a hard time sitting sitll unless my interest is TOTALLY engaged. Add this one to the list, along with “Benjamin Button”, “Secondhand Lions”, “The Bishop’s Wife” and “It’s a Wonderful Life”. When the DVD comes out, I’ll be there to get it.

After the movie, I made a short stop at Williams and Sonoma for a blue enamel skillet to match my beautiful blue casserole. Now I’m all set, Julia-wise. (And actually Wal-Mart sells some colorful and sturdy cookware, designed by Paula Deen, for very reasonable prices.)

Having gone to the movie I’ve long wanted to see–two more on the list–“My One and Only” and “The Time Traveler’s Wife”–I came home, fed the dogs, and WROTE happily for several hours. I had leftover Boeuf-B for supper, along with a nice glass of wine.

It’s all good.

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Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

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