#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


The Land of Enchantment

I’m back–after an extra day spent cooling my heels (and my temper) in Albuquerque, due to airline incompetency–and considering the many gifts of my trip to Santa Fe.

A friend-of-friends, David Cartwright, generously put us all up in his incredibly beautiful hilltop house. David’s house has a theme–what a concept–ravens. Hence its name: Los Cuervos–loosely translated, that means crows or ravens. The food was excellent, the art blew me away, and the dogs, Tojo and Kobe, provided smooth fur, saintly eyes, and that magical Dog Devotion that can heal a wounded heart. The view from the terraces at Los Cuervos was spectacular–nothing like a New Mexico lightning storm for sheer majesty.

Thank you, David, for making a stranger welcome.

Three of my best friends, Annie, Althea and Cindy, were there, too. Even better. Strong, smart women all, with incredibly diversified interests and talents. Cindy, for example, is among other things (a former model, Cindy puts Candice Bergen in the shade and seems to have no earthly idea how beautiful she is), a gifted photographer. Add a lot of hard work to that gift, and you’ve got photographs that will take your breath away. With Cindy’s help, I chose a new digital camera and she showed me how to use it. What a concept! I’ve been snapping pictures like a crazy woman ever since, and figuring out all sorts of wonderful ways to use them in my art.

Althea shares my deep interest in all things mystical, and she took me to her favorite Woo-Woo shop, the Ark, where I bought more Tarot decks and beautiful bags to tuck them inside. Althea recently lost her cherished little black Pom and traveling buddy, Ti Amo. We did our share of remembering, hugging and crying–it is a healing thing, to grieve.

And what can I say about Annie? I always call her Kodak, and she calls me Miller. Kodak is the best business woman in the world, practical to the inth degree. Rock-solid, that’s Kodak. She’ll listen, and call bull-*&^$ if necessary, but she never makes me feel bad for asking dumb questions or expressing opinions that often vary greatly from her own. Kodak’s vision of the world is crystal clear, but she never judges. I could tell her anything, and feel safe.

I am blessed to have these friends. I cherish them, and our time together.

I’m glad to be home, though, ready to push up my sleeves and get back to work, refreshed.

On the homefront, the staff house is finally finished and Mary Ann and family have moved out of the basement. All that space! A new phase begins–ripping up carpets, putting in bookshelves, etc. Soon, I will be working there, instead of here in my bedroom, which probably isn’t the greatest Fung Shui. :) I am so sensitive to energy, and this has become a room to work in, not to rest. The area has two large rooms–one will be my studio, hallelujah! And the main part, of course, will be all office.

I repeat: I am blessed.

Color me grateful.

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