#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


The Great Escape

Last night, after dinner, I was writing away in my downstairs office–the door was open to the yard, so the dogs and cats could go in and out. I had been busy for a while when I got one of those twinges all moms know so well–it was way too quiet.

I went outside to investigate. No dogs. No cats.

It’s a big yard, so I went around the corner nearest my office, thinking they might be sniffing the perimeters, one of their favorite things to do, and the driveway gate was wide open.

I don’t know why I didn’t panic–these animals are the only reason I have an 8 foot fence enclosing my back yard. I adore them. I called their names, and Bernice immediately trotted into sight up on the main driveway, her tiny body rimmed in the golden light of a setting sun. She was so pleased with herself, stubby little tail twitching. I started toward her, called “Where’s Sadie?” (As if the Yorkie would reply.)

Larry, the Canadian Wrangler, replied. He said, “Right here.” The two of them came into sight then, man and beagle. Sadie, like Bernice, was wagging her tail and smiling, so delighted that she’d been on an adventure. They’d gone to visit Mary Ann and Larry, next door–we often drop by for coffee and a chat, so they know the way. Thank heaven they weren’t hurt or lost–ChaCha, the cat, had not gone far from the gate, and Jitterbug, her sister, was inside the whole time. She missed the whole break-out. :) (This cat, we swear, travels between dimensions. We’ve all had the experience of searching high and low for her, with no luck, and then seen her simply appear again, clearly amused by all the fuss.)

A visiting service man left the gate open. The Wrangler will make sure THAT never happens again. All’s well that ends well, after all.

One more story before I go–Bernice (the Yorkie) likes to lay on the deck at the top of the steps, in the cooler hours of the morning and early evening. Of course my container garden is mostly on the deck, and the zinnias seem to attract hummingbirds…anyway, a flurry of movement attracted my attention, and I looked out to see Bernice and a tiny bird, virtually face to face. The hummingbird hovered not more than a foot in front of Bernice’s nose–she stayed absolutely still–it really looked as though they were sizing each other up, but there was no fear on either side. Just curiosity. What are you? they both seemed to wonder. Naturally, by the time I grabbed my camera, the moment was over.

It was priceless.

Miracles are everywhere.

Be blessed. Be brave. Everything will be okay.

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