#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Steve Miller

Today I’m going to tell you about Steve Miller, a good friend and a very talented western artist.

As you’ve no doubt noticed, we share the same last name. That’s because Steve is my ex-husband Rick’s first cousin. He lives in Montana, with his beautiful wife, Terry, and heads up the marketing department at Montana Silversmiths, the place where I buy a lot of great jewelry and purses :), but there’s more to Steve than marketing, and that’s for sure. Steve is a gifted sculptor and storyteller, and a genuine cowboy to boot. His event is team roping, and he’s the guy who got Wendy and I a behind-the-scenes look at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas this past December.

I think his work is truly spectacular, on a par with Remington and Russell, which is why I want to share it with you. At present, I own two of his pieces, “The Highest Price for Beef” and “When Beef was Wild”, and there are more on the way. Steve does his pieces in clay and wax first, then has them cast in bronze, and the detail is enough to take your breath away. He has a great love of the Old West–and the new one, too–and it comes through in his sculptures and the stories that accompany each one. On top of that, the price truly fits a cowboy’s (or cowgirl’s) budget–around $200–as Steve told me, a cowboy has to be able to afford them after paying entry fees, gambling, and a couple of beers. :) You can have a look online at http://www.montanasilversmiths.com/ or in person at your local Western store.

Me, I’m stocking up. This guy is going to be famous. Don’t say I didn’t tell you ahead of time, so you could get in on the ground floor. :)

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“Keep your ear to the ground” referred to the practice of plainsmen listening to the ground to hear hoof beats. It became the westerner’s warning to stay alert.

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