#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Slow But Steady

That’s the way things are going around here.

Not much time for art right now, as I’m in the thick of writing “The Creed Legacy”.

One member of the crew is down with a case of the flu, and I’m doing my level best to avoid catching it.

Here’s something for my gratitude list: my daughter’s cat, Claudia, was desperately ill earlier in the week, and had to stay at the vet clinic, with an IV going. It was tense, but I’m happy to report that the kitty is home again, and feeling better every day. We figure she must have nibbled on a poinsettia leaf. I knew poinsettias were dangerous to pets and small children, but since the former never seemed to even notice the plants and there aren’t any of the latter around here most of the time, I’d put them everywhere, enjoying the festive color. From now on, though, my Christmases with be poinsettia free. (The silk ones at Hobby Lobby are plenty beautiful, and nonpoisonous.)

I’ve been getting boxes of art supplies in the mail (our secret, okay?) and I’m gearing up to try encaustics, painting with wax. Too amazing–the colors are so rich and vibrant. I have a couple of collages in progress, too, on the wonderful, heavyweight water color paper I picked up while visiting Wendy and Jeremy in Santa Monica. Collage lends itself to my current situation, because things need to dry before a new layer can be added, and that lets me work on it in fifteen minute sessions.

There are a couple of new magazines out from Stampington & Company, my favorites, so I may have to buzz out to the book store to get them, if the roads are better later in the day. We’ll see. :)

In the meantime, I’ve got some people waiting for me in Lonesome Bend, Colorado, so I’d better get this show on the road.

And that, such as it is, is the news from my kitchen table.

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Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

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