#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Rambles

You’re probably getting bored with snow blogs. Still coming down, and a heap expected tomorrow. I sure am grateful that I work at home!

It’s summer in the book I’m writing–thank heavens. When I write, I’m right there with the characters, in the thick of things. This is mostly good. I live the story with the characters and that’s fine if they’re having fun. :) Lots of times, though, they’re not. They’re getting their hearts broken. They’re riding horses between Flagstaff and Stone Creek. They’re having major emotional confrontations. I go through all the same things with them, so by the end of the day, I need a glass of wine, horse and/or dog and cat time, and some puttering in my craft room.

Crafting is very theraputic for me. I’m never going to be a great artist, though I do have secret (not anymore) aspirations to have something in a gallery at some point. Since it’s either collaging/polymer clay/resin OR a LOT more wine, I continue to haunt Michael’s and my favorite websites. Check out www.artchixstudio.com –VERY cool. The resin casting requires the use of a blowtorch–housekeeper/cousin Mary Ann draws the line at me using things that shoot flames, since, 1) I’m a klutz and 2) like most writers, I am always knee-deep in some form of paper!

I don’t do things requiring drills or hammers, either–at least, not in the house. Bernice, my Yorkie, freaks out at weird noises.

Time to stop rambling and get back on the trail. Logan and Flannery expected me an hour ago, so they’re probably tapping their toes, looking at their watches, and asking, “Where IS that woman?”

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From the end of the Civil War until 1890, some 10 million head of cattle were driven from Texas to Kansas.

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