#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Pushing Up My Sleeves

I’m all rested up and ready to start the new project.  That really feels good.  New characters, new setting–the fictional Parable, Montana.  How exciting!

Of course it helps that we have lovely sunshine today, oodles of it, a wealth of it, glistening on leaves of grass and on the needles of pine and fir trees.  The sky is the color of the sugar bowl my mother gave me long ago–a soft, robin’s egg blue, with a hint of periwinkle.  I believe it was originally a premium that came in a bag of sugar or flour or a box of tea.  It is a reminder of my good childhood every time I catch a glimpse of it.

Still dining on the Boeuf B–it just gets better with every passing day.  Yum.

Also on the schedule, besides brainstorming the new story, is a badly needed haircut.  I tend to put them off as long as possible, until my hair just goes absolutely wild, because I hate, hate, hate sitting still for so long.  At this point, my hair, like Donald Trump’s eyebrows, practically needs a weed-eater.  :)

I’ve been making and receiving some really nice ATCs (all together now, everybody, artist trading cards!!!), trying new techniques.  Succeeding and failing.  Will it surprise you to hear that I have always learned a great deal more from the latter than from the former?  :) 

I’m still stuck when it comes to the sunflower painting, and I’m not ready to paint it over with gesso and start again, but I have certainly learned a lot from the exercise.

Which brings me to today’s personal commitment.  Today, I will move.  I will take that short walk I know I need.

And that’s the news.

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Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

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