#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


On the Home Stretch With Mojo

Mojo is the heroine of my current writing project, “Deadly Gamble”, which will be out in November of next year.

Getting to know Mojo has been a real discovery process. She’s even more of a handful to write about than Clare Westbrook, (of “Don’t Look Now”, “Never Look Back”, and “One Last Look”). Clare once saw the ghost of her sister, Tracy. Mojo deals with ghosts on an ongoing basis, starting with her ex-husband, Nick, and her childhood cat, Chester. She’s just starting out as a private detective, quite a jump from her former career as a medical billing clerk, and figuring things out as she goes along.

I love her audacity. I love her courage. I love her irreverent sense of humor.

At present, I’m planning three books, and finishing up book one now. I’m not sure, but I think this series could continue beyond the end of the third story. That, dear readers, will be up to you.

I will be writing a Special Edition next, and I’m looking forward to it. It’s a story I’ve long wanted to write–about two heroines and two heros, living in the same house in different centuries. There are some McKettricks mixed in here, and the house in which the story takes place is Holt and Lorelei’s place on the Triple M.

Soon, you will be meeting three modern McKettrick men–Rance, Keegan and Jesse. They are rodeo-riding, poker-playing rascals, and their women are more than a match. I’ll keep you updated on release dates.

A lot of you have asked about “The Man from Stone Creek”. That’s coming in June of 06.
“The Petticoat Cattle Company” is scheduled for June of 07.

Movin’ on.

Have COURAGE.

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“Keep your ear to the ground” referred to the practice of plainsmen listening to the ground to hear hoof beats. It became the westerner’s warning to stay alert.

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