#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Linda Strikes Gold!

I went out to feed the horses this morning–turned out, the Canadian Wrangler had already done it, and this two hours before he’s supposed to get on an airplane. (That’s dedication, ladies and gentlemen.) Anyway, since I was out and about, I decided to poke around in the shop, looking for my massive collection of rubber stamps, etc.

Well, what to my wondering eyes should appear? (I’m doing Christmas ATCs, bear with me). I found a photo album my mother kept for me as I was growing up–a treasure–and it’s been missing for YEARS. Just plain missing in action. I caught a flash of something red in the top of a box, and there it was!!!! I’m telling you, this cowgirl all but danced and shouted “Hallelujah!”

Now I can scan all those pictures, report cards, and other things–including a yellowed clipping from a movie magazine. I asked Michael Landon (I ADORED him, and still do) a question, and “he” answered (yeah, right), but I was convinced at the time. I wanted to know–badly enough to write a letter, no less–whether he was 25 or 26. And how often he visited his children. I was heartbroken over his divorce from the first wife (as far as I know), Dodie. I’ve often wondered what ever happened to her. :) I hope she remarried, and is very happy.

It’s hard when heroes disappoint, whether you’re 12 or 60. That’s why I’ll never disappoint you. You can count on my heroes doing the right thing. If that makes them predictable, so be it.

Now, I’ve got to catch up with Gideon. He’s planning to steal a bride (along with her two great-aunts and a housekeeper), five minutes before she says “I do” to the Wrong Man.

This, I’ve got to see.

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Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

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