#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Life is What Happens

….when you’ve made other plans. John Lennon was certainly right about that.

For instance, I planned on a full, uninterrupted day of writing today. The reality? Sadie-beagle has some kind of infection of the beagle-butt and needs to go to the vet. We’re leaving in a few minutes.

I was in an art/cooking frenzy all weekend, and I also finished reading Jennifer Niven’s marvelous, “Velva Jean Learns to Drive.” It’s been a very long time since I enjoyed a novel that much–I’ve already pre-ordered Niven’s next book, and I can hardly wait to get my hands on it. (Please don’t think I’m slighting romance here–I love my genre, but I don’t read a lot of romance because it’s a busman’s holiday for me.)

I’ve posted a picture of the 30×30 piece I call my Renaissance Showgirl :) on my Twitter page, along with a shot of the composition-notebook journal I’m painting. This is an involved process–I read about it in Somerset Studio’s new magazine, “Art Journaling”. Pages have to be glued together and then gessoed, and it takes FOREVER to dry. An exercise in patience.

Yikes. Patience is not my strong suit. Which means the Universe provides plenty of opportunities to test it.

Be kind. We’re all in this together.

I made BOTH Boeuf Bourg. AND Coq au Vin over the weekend–both were delicious. I will probably gnosh on the BB for the rest of this week–I froze the Coq au Vin. The recipe for the latter came from an excellent cookbook called “The Food of France”, purchased at Williams and Sonoma. I had C au V for supper and WOW, it was good, if I do say so myself. :)

I have gained a little weight since I quit smoking, no question about it. But I have a theory about food. It seems to me that if I actually cook, thus eating better food, I will be content with less food.

Leave a Reply




XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

:wink: :-| :-x :twisted: :) 8-O :( :roll: :-P :oops: :-o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :-D :evil: :cry: 8) :arrow: :-? :?: :!:





Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

READ MORE WESTERN FACTS »