#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Busy Me

The current work-in-progress, “Deadly Deceptions”, (November, 07, HQN.) is going well. Every day, Mojo surprises me with some new adventure. She certainly is a busy girl. I have to take vitamins, eat right, and get a lot of sleep–just to keep up with her!

October will be a busy month. First, there’s the Lael family reunion in Colville, a flying, one-day trip for me, then I’ll be keynoting at the LaJolla Writer’s Conference later in the month, THEN on to a suburb of Washington, D.C. to meet with the Humane Society of the United States. I’m going to be partnering with them in their Pets for Life program, and I’ll be giving you regular updates on that. On top of all this, of course, I will be writing, finishing “Deadly Deceptions” and moving on to write another Silhouette Special Edition. This one is called “The McKettrick Way”, and stars Meg McKettrick, a direct descendent of Holt and Lorelei. (“McKettrick’s Choice”, HQN, in stores now.) You’d think that would be enough to fill anybody’s month, wouldn’t you? Well, there’s more. I close on my lake house in mid-October, too, and will be christening it Primrose Cottage.

I probably won’t even get to catch my breath before November hits, and that’s big, too. The first Mojo book, “Deadly Gamble”, comes out October 30, and I’ll be promoting it throughout November in various ways. AND–mark your calendars, do not forget–Lifetime’s presentation of “The Last Chance Cafe”, starring the delectable Kevin Sorbo, is scheduled for November 13!

Lest you think I’m complaining–NO WAY. I am a very happy camper indeed, and a grateful one, too.

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Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

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