#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller
Back Home

I came home a day later than planned, which is why I didn’t have a blog up yesterday.

My visit to Oregon was absolutely wonderful. I enjoyed my gig at the Northwest Women’s Show enormously–put a microphone in my hand and I turn into Oprah–but by far the best part was spending time with my lovely sister, Sally and her funny, fabulous family. I visted my niece, aka Miss Lang, at the wonderful little school where she teaches. I honestly did not know there were still schools that small–it was even smaller, I think, than the one I attended in Northport. I also dropped in on my other niece, Sam, at the shop where she works. What fun it was to see my nieces in such an adult context. Didn’t get to hook up with nephew, Jesse, but next time. I did get some time with his beautiful little son, Jaden the Extraordinary.

Sally and I, along with sister Pam, are craft fanatics. We visited Craft Warehouse, in Salem, and I went absolutely crazy. I had to buy an extra suitcase to carry home the loot, and Sally STILL has to send three boxes!

My heart is very heavy over the fires in the San Diego area. So many people losing their homes, and all those displaced pets. I’m praying hard, and know all of you are, too.

As for the homefront, we’re ready to begin the staff house on the adjoining property–the lumber has been delivered. We’re all believing Mary Ann and husband Larry will be in by Christmas. I’ll be giving you regular updates on that.

Cowgirl on the Road

I’m leaving in a little while to fly to Portland for the Northest Women’s Show. Details of the appearance are on yesterday’s blog–I hope you’ll stop by and say howdy if you happen to be in the area.

There will be a lot of free time on this trip, so Sister Sally and I plan to hit some craft and fabric stores, and schoomze up a storm. All I’ve got to say about that is, “Wah-hoo!”

When I get back home, I’ll have yarns to spin.

Have a truly wonderful weekend.

“Keep your ear to the ground” referred to the practice of plainsmen listening to the ground to hear hoof beats. It became the westerner’s warning to stay alert.