#1 NYT bestselling author Linda Lael Miller


Blessed Silence

Sitting here at my kitchen table, all I hear is the chirping of birds, along with the entirely normal sound of Sadie-beagle snoring on her dog bed nearby. Most days, there would be voices–from the TV. I usually switch on the morning news as soon as the first cup of coffee is ready, but today is an exception. I’ve declared a moratorium on news–earthquakes, another war looming, the economy. What’s next? A giant meteor headed for Omaha?!

I’ve had it. I can’t take it anymore, I tell you. I need a break from the news just to process and assimilate all the bad stuff that’s already happened.

Maybe I’ll tune in again when it gets better. :) Sort of like, “beatings will continue until morale improves.”

Thank goodness I have my story to get lost in. Things are tough in Blue River, Texas, December of 1914, too, of course, but there’s a guaranteed happy ending.

Call me crazy. I love a happy ending.

Leave a Reply




XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

:wink: :-| :-x :twisted: :) 8-O :( :roll: :-P :oops: :-o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :-D :evil: :cry: 8) :arrow: :-? :?: :!:





Cattle drives rarely went more than ten or twelve miles a day, as the cattle had to be given time to rest and graze. A drive from Texas to Montana could take up to five months.

READ MORE WESTERN FACTS »